Elder Law

No one wants to think about health and financial issues that often arise as we age. However, it’s important to discuss and plan for what will happen to you and your property if you become incapacitated or need medical care. By avoiding such planning, you leave it to family (or sometimes strangers) to make those decisions for you during a stressful time and they may not necessarily act in accordance with your wishes. In fact, dealing with a family member who can no longer take care of himself/herself is a frequent source of conflict within families as they argue over who has control and what should be done.

In addition, when it comes to your finances, it may be too late to preserve your assets if you wait. Transferring property, setting up trusts, buying long-term care insurance and other tactics must be done before you need care.

Do you really want someone else to have control over your life and your money? We hope these blog posts will educate you about some of the personal, financial and legal concerns you should consider as part of your elder planning.

Visit our Elder Law practice page to learn more about our services.

 

Planning for Longevity: What It Means for Women

By | November 30th, 2017|Elder Law|

Joe Coughlin, the director of the MIT Age Lab, recently wrote a book, The Longevity Economy, to help companies unlock the world’s

Why won’t people plan for a health crisis?

By | October 16th, 2017|Elder Law|

Recently, researchers compiled results from over 150 studies from 2011 to 2016 looking at how many individuals had some kind of advance

How Collaborative Divorce Helps Grandparents and Grandchildren

By | August 17th, 2017|Elder Law, Matrimonial & Family Law|

High conflict divorces affect not just spouses and children, but also grandparents and other extended family. Suddenly there are a host of

BECOME A PRO CHOICE SENIOR

By | April 26th, 2017|Elder Law|

I recently heard a TV  commercial which went something like "make aging a CHOICE and not a CHALLENGE"!   As an elder